Facebook Needs Your Nudes To Fight Against Nudes Virality

Facebook hates nudity

As funny as this might sound, but yeh it’s actually true that Facebook is asking people to share their nude photos. But this isn’t what it really sounds like.

An inhuman act of mockery or vengeance causing people to share other people’s  nudes online will soon be a thing of the past as the social network plan is to make sure people’s nude photos aren’t used for revenge porn by a disgruntled ex-boyfriend or girlfriend, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corp.

Though Facebook already has a reporting system in place for users when someone’s intimate photos are shared without their respective consent, but the idea with this program is to get away with the photos before they go viral in the first place.

The procedure to this is users will share their photos with Facebook via its Messenger app and the company will then “hash” the images, thereby converting the photos to a unique digital code. Once Facebook generates that code, it will block the images from ever being uploaded to its site.

The company is piloting the technology in Australia with a small government agency headed by e-Safety Commissioner Julie Inman Grant.

Inman Grant told the ABC.

“We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly,”

Other big tech companies still exercise this measure of hashing technology in efforts to rid the internet of child pornography. Google, Microsoft and Twitter have used unique digital codes to detect exploitative images, most of which have led to the arrests of people distributing the photographs on the web.

READ  FACEBOOK TESTS SPLITTING NEWS FEED FEATURE

Facebook explicit images

Facebook blog post on Thursday gives more specifics on the pilot project.

“We’re constantly working to prevent revenge porn and was looking to try something different. For the program, the social network has partnered with an international working group of survivors, victim advocates and other experts”.

“This measure is completely voluntary,” by Antigone Davis, Facebook’s global head of safety. “It’s a protective measure that can help prevent a much worse scenario where an people’s explicit image goes viral”.

As an online entrepreneur and webmaster in Nigeria, I love technology! As a result, and to earnestly contribute to tech awareness within individuals, I find the need to give digital-based insight of the technology world today, hence, making individuals well tech rounded and get the need to acquire technical skills.

One Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.